Thursday, March 15, 2012

The Hunger Games By Suzanne Collins






For more on critical literacy go to
www.vivianvasquez.com or
www.clippodcast.com


7 comments:

  1. It is interesting that you decided to narrow in on one specific theme in the novel. I love that you went very in-depth on that theme but it may have been equally as interesting if you talked generally about the many themes in the book. Also, great job bringing in outside women and showing our power :)

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  2. I really liked the perspective you took on this book and your definition of feminism! I also liked how you included your sister and the message she receives from the novel. I really hope we start having more leading female roles.
    -Danielle

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  3. I really enjoyed your analysis of how Collins kind of redefined the idea of feminism into a concept of female empowerment. You did a really great job of explaining the importance for female readers to identify Katniss as a symbol of a strong, outspoken, female character. As professor vasquez explained, no text is neutral. Since you viewed this book to be so focused on the female lead, I think it should be just as important to examine how males should be guided through this text.

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  4. This was a great way to discuss powerful women in light of the way women have been portrayed in YA novels such as Twilight. What I like (and sometimes hate) about Katniss, is the way she reacts to the society of Panem. In the third book, she acts so unlike the strong character she was in the first novel, but this is a side effect of her struggles. Katniss owns her voice like Emily says and because of that she and Collins ultimately succeed.

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  5. I enjoyed how you focused on the theme of gender roles when discussing the Hunger Games. I think one of the key points of success for the book, is the fact that Katniss is an independent thinker and breaks the stereotypes of typical female leads. I think it would have also been interesting to discuss the influence of race and economic status portrayed in the book, forming Katniss's character. -Maddie

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  6. After recently reading The Hunger Games, I too came to the conclusion that you did. Katniss is definitely someone who does not follow female stereotypes and traditional gender roles. I liked that you were able to talk to your younger sister about how she feels about the book and what message she is taking from it. While this was a great way to analyze the novel, I feel that there were so many other opportunities in the book that would have been great for analysis. Subjects like race and the fact that District Eleven is primarily African-American would have been a great way to transition. Overall, this is a really fascinating book and a very thorough and interesting analysis.

    Liam

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  7. As a fan of the Hunger Games series, I found the analysis on the Katniss interesting. The emphasis on feminism and the significance of a powerful female lead had not crossed my mine while reading the series. I had paid more attention to how the philosophy of human nature was depicted and the dynamics of their civil society. The presence of a strong female protagonist is not new to me, but there aren’t many that are as popular as they should be. I think your podcast does a good job as it sheds light on the issues regarding gender stereotypes and the misrepresentation of women throughout our society. Now I’m eager to go back and re-read the series and look out for themes that I didn’t catch before and perhaps deepen my understanding of the many puzzle pieces of a larger picture.

    -Maureen

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