Sunday, March 18, 2012

The Popularity Papers: Research for the Social Improvement and General Betterment of Lydia Goldblatt and Julie Graham-Chang

A podcast by Danielle.



4 comments:

  1. I loved this podcast because of how similar the series is to "Diary of a Wimpy Kid," the book I did my podcast in. While the books are intended for different genders, the issues of race and family structure are very similar. It is quite concerning that African American lead characters are often left out or overlooked, especially in a day and age where we try to promote diversity.

    ReplyDelete
  2. This podcast was fascinating to me and led me to think back on our conversation about the Hunger Games. While Suzanne Collins approached the characters in a multidimensional and multiracial way, most readers still read them as whitewashed. Unfortunately, I feel people write about what they know. It may have been an unfortunate circumstance, but many refuse to humanize characters of other races and instead back them into stereotypes. They assume an African American female has to be sassy, or can't be shy. As a whole, we would benefit from not stereotyping characters like Suzanne Collins did and letting the characters speak for themselves. For the Popularity Papers, the authors may have been limited in their own worldviews and such didn't explore them further.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I liked your podcast approach. You related the book to your life and how books have affected you. You brought up important ideas that other can relate to. You were able to analyze the book in a way I would not have been able to because I grew up reading and seeing characters that looked like me. I liked listening to your point of view and I found what you had to say very important and I will definitely keep it in mind when I become a teacher.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I liked how you started off with a personal story and immediately connected to the book. When you said, "imagery is just as important as text", I thought of all the books from my book list and how I would closely analyze the pictures. The images impact children just as much if not more than text. Not having African-American or multiracial characters hurts children in ways that many people do not realize. This podcast was very interesting and I like how it was not necessarily a critique of the book's message or plot, but of it's images and lack of diversity.

    ReplyDelete